Cloudy with a Chance

A uniquely beautiful nerd.


Ask Away   Submit to the Qun
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Reblogged from exhaustedapostate

SHOULD I LIVE BLOG PLAYING DA2????

Might be interesting.

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Reblogged from viva-la-fat
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Reblogged from megg33k

jabberwockypie:

rupeerose:

teafortrouble:

megg33k:

I need feminism because most men’s restrooms still aren’t equipped with baby changing stations. As someone who was married to a man who had sole custody of his young son, I’m hyperaware that feminism means EQUALITY, not female superiority. Feminism should and does support a man’s right to be as much of a parent to his child(ren) as any mother is allowed/expected to be.

This is a constant problem for Mr. Tea and myself. We’ve got twins, so even though I can change one kid on the change table in the ladies’ room, he’s left standing sort of awkwardly in the lobby with a messy child while I change one, come back, and get the other.

Nobody’s suggesting that men aren’t parents, so the lack of change tables goes well beyond ‘gender role reinforcing’ and straight into ‘ridiculous’.

My dad actually almost got kicked out of a mall once for changing my brother in the womens room of a mall. The only reason they didn’t call the cops on him was because the ladies in the room supported him.

It’s certainly better than the “Find random, hopefully-trustworthy-looking female stranger and ask that she escort your four-year-old daughter into the bathroom.” thing my dad had to do a few times.  (And I HATED strangers and/or was terrified of them.)   Family Restrooms need to be a much more wide-spread thing.

More than once I’ve been approached by a dad with a young daughter and asked to take her into the ladies room. I absolutely agree that there should be Parent Bathrooms that are not gendered.

(via madmaudlingoes)

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Reblogged from stevejimmy

How bra stores seem to think things work:

  • Anything smaller than a C cup: must be pre-pubescent. Ugly patterns, and colours. Lots of animals and stripes. Training bras. You're 12, right?
  • C to D cup: A woman! Pretty lacy things, nice patterns, large variety.
  • Anything over a D cup: Beige. Lots and lots of beige.
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Reblogged from etsyifyourenasty
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Reblogged from pizza-grrrl
somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”
King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.
“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”
Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.


This woman is amazing.

somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”

King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.

“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”

Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.

This woman is amazing.

(Source: pizza-grrrl, via madmaudlingoes)

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Reblogged from spicyshimmy

spicyshimmy:

DRAGON AGE: INQUISITION box art

Looks good.

(via flutiebear)

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Reblogged from dumbbellsandfastcars

Reblog if you’re one of the few people who actually like broccoli.

madmaudlingoes:

sabotabby:

mme-hardy:

I not only like broccoli, I like broccoli rabe. It’s good not being a supertaster!

I have no tastebuds, so anything is great as long as it’s drenched in hot sauce.

Could that be why you don’t have any taste buds, Sabs?

I love raw broccoli stems in particular.

(Source: dumbbellsandfastcars)

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Reblogged from lostgrrrls

You want to say Hi to the cute girl on the subway. How will she react? Fortunately, I can tell you with some certainty, because she’s already sending messages to you. Looking out the window, reading a book, working on a computer, arms folded across chest, body away from you = do not disturb. So, y’know, don’t disturb her. Really. Even to say that you like her hair, shoes, or book. A compliment is not always a reason for women to smile and say thank you. You are a threat, remember? You are Schrödinger’s Rapist. Don’t assume that whatever you have to say will win her over with charm or flattery. Believe what she’s signaling, and back off.

If you speak, and she responds in a monosyllabic way without looking at you, she’s saying, “I don’t want to be rude, but please leave me alone.” You don’t know why. It could be “Please leave me alone because I am trying to memorize Beowulf.” It could be “Please leave me alone because you are a scary, scary man with breath like a water buffalo.” It could be “Please leave me alone because I am planning my assassination of a major geopolitical figure and I will have to kill you if you are able to recognize me and blow my cover.”

On the other hand, if she is turned towards you, making eye contact, and she responds in a friendly and talkative manner when you speak to her, you are getting a green light. You can continue the conversation until you start getting signals to back off.

The fourth point: If you fail to respect what women say, you label yourself a problem.

There’s a man with whom I went out on a single date—afternoon coffee, for one hour by the clock—on July 25th. In the two days after the date, he sent me about fifteen e-mails, scolding me for non-responsiveness. I e-mailed him back, saying, “Look, this is a disproportionate response to a single date. You are making me uncomfortable. Do not contact me again.” It is now October 7th. Does he still e-mail?

Yeah. He does. About every two weeks.

This man scores higher on the threat level scale than Man with the Cockroach Tattoos. (Who, after all, is guilty of nothing more than terrifying bad taste.) You see, Mr. E-mail has made it clear that he ignores what I say when he wants something from me. Now, I don’t know if he is an actual rapist, and I sincerely hope he’s not. But he is certainly Schrödinger’s Rapist, and this particular Schrödinger’s Rapist has a probability ratio greater than one in sixty. Because a man who ignores a woman’s NO in a non-sexual setting is more likely to ignore NO in a sexual setting, as well.

So if you speak to a woman who is otherwise occupied, you’re sending a subtle message. It is that your desire to interact trumps her right to be left alone. If you pursue a conversation when she’s tried to cut it off, you send a message. It is that your desire to speak trumps her right to be left alone. And each of those messages indicates that you believe your desires are a legitimate reason to override her rights.

For women, who are watching you very closely to determine how much of a threat you are, this is an important piece of data.

an excerpt from Phaedra Starling’s “Schrödinger’s Rapist: or a guy’s guide to approaching strange women without being maced” (via lostgrrrls)

HOLY FUCK THE TRUTH.

Can every one of my male followers read this? And please, before you get defensive (“I would never rape anyone!”) keep in mind, women being afraid of Shrodinger’s Rapists (oh my god i still can’t get over the encompassing brilliance of this phrase) is a conditioned, learned response from being immersed in rape culture and the evolution of sexism and sexual violence in our society from the day we’re born. And unfortunately, it’s very difficult to unlearn without the efforts of all genders to dismantle it. Which is where you come in.

(via lil-ith)

It’s also just rude and disrespectful to patently ignore what someone has told you regarding their personal space, body, and time. Get a clue.

(via geekdomme)

I will always reblog this. Always.

(via myherocomplex)

So if you speak to a woman who is otherwise occupied, you’re sending a subtle message. It is that your desire to interact trumps her right to be left alone.

(via alamaris)

Hell yes to all of this.

(via madmaudlingoes)

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Reblogged from lacalacabby

deducecanoe:

dontbearuiner:

ooh-shiny-things:

winneganfake:

lacalacabby:

Can we make a petition for Oded Fehr to be cast as Doctor Strange? Is it possible because it needs to be done.

FUCKING HELL YES. 

give this to me now.

Josh and I have been saying this for months.

I accept this and wish for it to be so. It will probably be a pasty white dude tho.

Omg yes yes yes yes yes …

(via madmaudlingoes)

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Reblogged from ralkana

ralkana:

wildcardgal reblogged your post and added:

What is Churrasco?

Brazilian barbecue, basically. About fifteen different kinds of meat grilled on a spit, that they bring to you sizzling on the spit. They slice pieces off for you, and they keep bringing it until you tell them to stop. Plus sides like salad and rice and beans, and nummy tiny cheese breads.

My friend and I traditionally go for her birthday, and then for mine.

That sounds really good. Happy birthday to you and yoir fri3md, whenever that day may be.

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Reblogged from occupywatchdog
occupywatchdog:

Homelessness In America - #uniteblue -
 There’s right way on how to approach the homeless problem homelessness in America and there’s a wrong way on how to approach the problem.

Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.  Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.

Different cities in the US tried different approaches on how to tackle the homeless problem at the local level. The only problem with these ideas is it’s disrespectful and inhumane towards homeless population.

City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.

A red state has better solution toward dealing with homelessness problem that’s humane and respectful.

This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.  How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail stays for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but they keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.  It sounds like Utah borrowed a page from Homes Not Handcuffs, the 2009 report by The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and The National Coalition for the Homeless. Using a 2004 survey and anecdotal evidence from activists, the report concluded that permanent housing for the homeless is cheaper than criminalization. Housing is not only more human, it’s economical.  This happened in a Republican state! Republicans in Congress would probably have required the homeless to take a drug test before getting an apartment, denied apartments to homeless people with criminal records, and evicted those who failed to become self-sufficient after five years or so. But Utah’s results show that even conservative states can solve problems like homelessness with decidedly progressive solutions.

More cities should adopt Utah’s solution toward solving the homeless at the local.  It’s also worth pointing out that among the homeless population are also war veterans from previous wars. Statistics from the National Coalition for Homeless Vaterans:

12% of the homeless adult population are veterans
20% of the male homeless population are veterans
68% reside in principal cities
32% reside in suburban/rural areas
51% of individual homeless veterans have disabilities
50% have serious mental illness
70% have substance abuse problems
51% are white males, compared to 38% of non-veterans
50% are age 51 or older, compared to 19% non-veterans

Again, any solution towards solving the homeless problem in America needs to handled in a humane and respectful toward the homeless. Especially homeless veterans who serve in the military honorably.  Source: Nation Of Chancge


This may be the only time I’ll ever say “Go Utah”.

occupywatchdog:

Homelessness In America - #uniteblue -



There’s right way on how to approach the homeless problem homelessness in America and there’s a wrong way on how to approach the problem.
Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.

Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.
Different cities in the US tried different approaches on how to tackle the homeless problem at the local level. The only problem with these ideas is it’s disrespectful and inhumane towards homeless population.
  • City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
  • Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
  • Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
  • Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.
A red state has better solution toward dealing with homelessness problem that’s humane and respectful.
This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.

How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail stays for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but they keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

It sounds like Utah borrowed a page from Homes Not Handcuffs, the 2009 report by The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and The National Coalition for the Homeless. Using a 2004 survey and anecdotal evidence from activists, the report concluded that permanent housing for the homeless is cheaper than criminalization. Housing is not only more human, it’s economical.

This happened in a Republican state! Republicans in Congress would probably have required the homeless to take a drug test before getting an apartment, denied apartments to homeless people with criminal records, and evicted those who failed to become self-sufficient after five years or so. But Utah’s results show that even conservative states can solve problems like homelessness with decidedly progressive solutions.
More cities should adopt Utah’s solution toward solving the homeless at the local.

It’s also worth pointing out that among the homeless population are also war veterans from previous wars.

Statistics from the National Coalition for Homeless Vaterans:
  • 12% of the homeless adult population are veterans
  • 20% of the male homeless population are veterans
  • 68% reside in principal cities
  • 32% reside in suburban/rural areas
  • 51% of individual homeless veterans have disabilities
  • 50% have serious mental illness
  • 70% have substance abuse problems
  • 51% are white males, compared to 38% of non-veterans
  • 50% are age 51 or older, compared to 19% non-veterans
Again, any solution towards solving the homeless problem in America needs to handled in a humane and respectful toward the homeless. Especially homeless veterans who serve in the military honorably.

Source: Nation Of Chancge

This may be the only time I’ll ever say “Go Utah”.

(via madmaudlingoes)

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Reblogged from ralkana

ralkana:

The problem with eating a ridiculous amount of Brazilian churrasco for lunch and then falling into a food coma at four o’clock is that it’s now 1:30 in the morning and I’m WIDE AWAKE.

Good thing there’s new fic to read!

What is Churrasco?

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Reblogged from alogicals

Anonymous asked: I really think you're taking the casting of the Maximoff twins way too personally. I'm sure Joss Whedon wasn't out to offend you when he made his decision. He wanted two young fresh up and coming actors who already had Hollywood acclaim and that is understandable.

alogicals:

hey pal, fuck you.

joss whedon probably wasn’t out to offend me personally, no, but guess what butterplum, he did anyway.

because i grew up in a neighbourhood where the other parents told their children they weren’t allowed to play with me because i was dirty and untrustworthy and a thief.
because i had ethnic slurs hurled at me from my fellow students and other residents throughout the majority of my life. because the german word for gypsy was spraypainted onto our house wall 8 times throughout the years we lived there and, on one memorable occasion, keyed into my mum’s car.
because my mum’s mother died in a russian concentration camp and no one would help her father raise his five daughters alone because everyone viewed him as waste, expendable.
because my mother eventually had to fend for herself on the streets as an orphan when she was only 13 years old because she had literally no other choice. because she was mistreated in the orphanage she eventually went to, and because she was thrown out of three schools for “misconduct” that was really just profiling based on the fact that she had roma heritage.
because even though she managed to leave that part of her life mostly behind and found a family and get a job, her sisters weren’t so lucky. one of them permanently ended up in a mental institution after being denied healthcare by the country she lived in due to her heritage and her psychosis grew unchecked until it evolved into fullblown schizophrenia. one of them killed herself. she hasn’t heard from the other two in years and isn’t even sure if they’re alive anymore.
because 90% of roma people live in poverty. because 45% of those fall under extreme poverty with living conditions without water and electricity and basic things like food. (x)

so yes, i take it personally. because it is fucking personal.
the maximoffs were literally the only representation of romani people i’ve encountered so far that weren’t either a stereotype or a criminal. the fact that they were allowed to be heroes and stand for positive ideals despite their background was revolutional for me when i first learned about them, because my entire life i’ve been made to feel that being roma is bad and disgusting.

it’s bad enough that wanda maximoff was already turned into an ableist joke and fridged twice in the comics.

and joss whedon looked at their background history and how hugely important it is for minorities and deemed it not important enough to be included.
that’s especially horrible considering the fact that not only are roma people treated like scum everywhere, anti-semitism is still very much a constant threat to jewish people everywhere and anti-semitic hate crimes are on a rise.

the fact that joss whedon didn’t even waste one thought on the repercussions of his decision when he retconned the maximoff twins to be british is frankly disgusting and speaks volumes about the kind of person he is.
and if you look at his decision and find absolutely nothing wrong with it, then it speaks volumes about the kind of person you are, too.

To the poster above me: I wish I could make this better and different and other-than-it-is for you.

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Reblogged from gguillotte

gguillotte:

(via Neil DeGrasse Tyson Said What He Thinks About Race Now That He’s Made It, And Almost Nobody Noticed)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=KEeBPSvcNZQ

"The panel features Richard Dawkins, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ann Druyan and Victor Stenger.

Moderated by D.J. Grothe (of Point of Inquiry), it took place at the New York Academy of Sciences at a Center for Inquiry conference titled “Secular Society and its Enemies.”

The panel discusses atheism versus science, science education, the nature of science, various strategies for advancing society in society, threats to science education including religion and popular culture, racism and sexism in science, and many other topics.”

1:01:10

Old White Guy: “The Larry Summers question. What’s up with chicks in science?” (audience laughter)

Moderator: “Slightly off topic but nonetheless interesting.” (OWG: “It’s scientific, eh?”) “Does anyone want to field the genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science? Anyone want to touch that?”

A: “I’ve never been female, (audience laughter) but I have been black my whole life (audience laughter). And, so, let me perhaps offer some insight from that perspective, because there are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community as well as the community of women in a male, a white male-dominated society. And I’ll be brief because I want to try to get more questions.

When I look at throughout my life—I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old, my first visit to the Hayden Planetarium. I was a little younger than Victor (Stenger) at the time, I was, although he did it before I did (audience laughter). And so, so I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expression of these ambitions, and all I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist, was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of nature in soci—forces of society.

Any time I expressed this interest, teachers, they, “Don’t you want to be an athlete? Don’t you want to—” I wanted to become something that was outside of the paradigms of expectation of that, of the people in power. And so, so, fortunately my depth of interest in the universe’s so deep and so fuel-enriched that every one of these curveballs that I was thrown in, fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reached for more fuel and I kept going.

Now here I am, one—I think—one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I want to look behind me and say, where are the others who might have been this and they’re not there? And I wonder, how, who, what is the blood on the tracks that I happened to survive that others did not, simply because the forces of society that prevented—at EVERY turn, at EVERY turn, to the point where I have security guards following me as I go through department stores presuming that I am some, that I am a thief—I walked out of a store one time and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate, and that guy just walked off with the stolen goods knowing that they would have stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation of this— (Ann Druyan: what a scam) —what a scam that was! I take it—people should do that more often! (AD: I’m going shopping with you!) (laughter) So, so my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I KNOW these forces are REAL, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you’ve got to come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation. (Applause)

1:05:00

Reblogging this because wow yes.

(via fangirlfeminists)